What is Home Schooling?

Home schooling occurs when parents take charge of their children’s education — organizing subjects, teaching lessons or arranging for tutors, evaluating progress, and supervising social contacts. Home school parents believe that one-on-one attention and individualized study produce the best education possible. (Many also think that peer groups are NOT necessarily the best “socializing agent” for their children.)

Full-time home schooling as a replacement for classroom education is legal in all fifty states, and home schooled children consistently score very highly on standardized tests and other measures of academic performance. Home schooling is no longer a fringe movement; recent surveys suggest that over a million American children are currently taught at home, and the number grows every year. Although many home school families are two-parent households with one breadwinner and one stay-at-home parent, many other families arrange home schooling around dual careers, single-parent schedules, and other less traditional arrangements.

Thousands of families also use home schooling resources and techniques to supplement or partially replace a traditional school environment. These “afterschoolers” recognize that parents are ultimately in charge of a child’s education, and choose to work with teachers and school systems to provide the best education possible.

Who else is homeschooling?

A whole lot of folks over at our forums. And you might also enjoy these recent stories:

Homeschooling, City-Style
The Rise of Homeschooling Among Black Families
The Techies
Homeschooling: Setting the Record Straight

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